Archive | May, 2015

WEB_LHJ Sonora_SH base_0249

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Raiders beat Knights, move to CIF Quarterfinals

Posted on 26 May 2015 by La Habra Journal

By Erik Markus
La Habra Journal

The Sonora Raiders advance to the Southern Section Quarterfinals with a 5-2 victory against Katella.

The Raiders battled back, scoring five unanswered runs to shut down the Knights.WEB_LHJ Sonora_SH base_0173

Austin Weddle toed the rubber for the Raiders who worked in and out of jams for six innings.

“He seems to be fighting himself all the time, he’s cutting his pitches off short,” Tellers said.

Weddle started the game reliant on his fastball, but gained command of his curveball and changeup.

“He just kept battling through it,” Tellers said.

Weddle however did not have much help behind him as the Raiders defense showed one of their weaker performances.

With runners on first and second base and one out in the bottom of the seventh inning, the Raiders got some timely defense off the bench.

Alex Penaloza hit a deep fly ball to left field. Jacob Tennyson trailed the high fly ball into the corner and eventually caught it before it got lost in the corner.

Tennyson is regarded as the fastest player in the Sonora baseball program with a 6.3 second 60 yard dash.

“He’s usually the guy out there in the late innings, and he had the smarts to get that one back in the infield,” Tellers said.

Katella was on the run, so when Tennyson hauled it in, both runners had a long run to get back to their bases, allowing Tennyson to relay a ball into the infield to double off Matt Morello from first.

“I thought for sure it was going to be a 5-4 game with a runner on third,” Tellers said expecting the play to end as a triple.WEB_LHJ Sonora_SH base_0583

The throw ended the game securing a 5-2 victory.

Katella scored their first run in the second inning.

With two on and no outs, Eduardo Ureno dropped a bunt down in front of Eli Villalobos. Villalobos tried to throw the runner out at second, but his throw sailed into center field scoring Penaloza. With runners on the corners Katella hit a grounder to Justin Mellano. Mellano made a strong throw to home to tie Gabriel Gamboa up between the basepath in a pickle. Weddle struck the next batter out before escaping the jam one batter later.

Wilem Drozdowski reached on an infield single in the third to set the table for the Raiders. JP Sarro followed with another single to put runners on first and second. Eli Villalobos fouled off a pitch in front of the Raiders dugout, and Drozdowski tagged up after Roberto Jaime bobbled the catch in front of the fence. Dylan Villalobos singled up the middle to tie the game, bringing in Drozdowski.

The Raiders added to their run total in the fourth with a leadoff single by Jake Rosander. Mellano then sacrificed him over to second.

Gabe Armstrong singled putting runners on the corners and Jason Clayton singled down the line to bring in Rosander for a 2-1 lead.

In the sixth, the Raiders scored their third run on back to back doubles from Mellano and Armstrong. Armstrong would try to score on a single to left, but was thrown out at the plate. Armstrong appeared to injure his hamstring on the play.

In the seventh inning, Katella’s pitching trouble led to two runs for the Raiders.WEB_LHJ Sonora_SH base_0249

“It’s about making plays,” Tellers said, “Defense will usually cost you games, I think we got a couple from them because of mistakes on defense, and I know for sure we threw a few away.”

Eli Villalobos reached on an infield single to third base. He took second on a wild pitch and went to third on Dylan’s single to center. Another wild pitch scored Eli and put Dylan at second.

Chandler Koontz reached on a walk, then swiped second on a wild pitch. Dylan Villalobos scored on another wild pitch to give the Raiders a 5-1 lead.

The Knights season ended after they scored their second run off of Sarro who came in to pitch.

Morello singled to left to drive in the run, but would be out retreating on Penaloza’s fly ball to left.

With the Raiders road victory, they will host Serrano who knocked out Victor Valley in a 5-2 victory. That game will be played on Friday afternoon.

“It’s been a fight, and hopefully we can continue fighting,” Tellers said.

The Raiders carry 11 Seniors, and will look to the to carry the load as the season continues.

“We know that everyone’s in this together, but it’s their deal. They have no tomorrow,” Tellers said.

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LH Council approves new city hall

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LH Council approves new city hall

Posted on 26 May 2015 by La Habra Journal

By Brianna Flores
La Habra Journal

With a described focus on future economic developments of the city, the La Habra city council took the next step in what will relocate and redesign the current city hall and convert the existing space into a residential area.La Habra Elevations 2-6-15_Page_1_WEB
The council unanimously approved the purchase of the parcel of land on the southeast corner of La Habra Boulevard and Euclid Street and the development of a new civic center.  It also approved the rezoning of the current civic center property to allow for residential development and sale of the city land.
The city hall relocation and redesign, also referred to as the Civic Center Project, is being completed in phases. On Monday night, members of the council voted to approve Phase 2 and continue on to Phase 3.
In approving Phase 2, an additional $254,000 for construction document preparation, an additional $60,512 and an amendment to a project manager contract up to $35,000 were all approved.
Andrew Ho, director of economic development, outlined the cost and financing options for the project. According to Ho, redesigning and relocating city hall and converting it into a Civic Center would cost an estimated $19 million. The price includes purchasing the land and the cost of renovations.
Ho presented three possible financing options for the project, including internal borrowing from general fund reserves, utility authority and traditional lease financing.La Habra Landscape 2-5-15
City Manager Jim Sadro said that his strong financial background helped him to recommend approving Phase 2.
“This is the kind of project that doesn’t come along very often. In fact, it’s a unique opportunity being right across the street in what’s essentially current office buildings that can be reconfigured into a Civic Center complex, and us to do an exchange with a residential builder to come and build homes on this side of the street,” Sadro said.

He also said that La Habra has a very strong economy base and establishing a Civic Center and building a new residential area at the core of the city would stimulate economic growth.
“We’re not a bank. We’re not an organization where you are given a bonus for saving all your money for a rainy day that may never come. You have to, at times, take risks to invest in any project that you think has a broader, overall significance to your community, to your infrastructures, to your facilities,” Sadro said.
Mark Sturdevant, president of the chamber of commerce, said he was inspired by the information presented.
“I’m always excited about progress in the community. To see things move, to see it evolve into something that it can be and should be. Sometimes I get concerned that we may move too fast in a direction with half the consideration because it’s fun and exciting – but I don’t see that here in this project. I see planning, research, a lot of consideration to the community, traffic studies and the types of buildings we’re proposing here. This is what you do in order to make an informed decision,” Sturdevant said.201 E La Habra Blvd - City Ventures - Att 3 - site floor elevations plan_Page_19
Sturdevant wants to see the downtown area of La Habra polished and revitalized so that it can be a place where residents can bring their friends and relatives. In addition, he said that a new city hall would be beneficial in attracting new business prospects.
Joe Oftelie, director of development for City Ventures, the developer that that will be building the homes on the site of the current city hall, explained the costs and logistics for the 71 residential homes.
City Ventures has built homes in many Orange County cities including Fullerton, Brea, and Yorba Linda. The company prides itself on being green and economically friendly. The new homes would have all-electric appliances, solar panels and drought-tolerant plants.

201 E La Habra Blvd - City Ventures - Att 3 - Landscape plan
Beamish expressed concern about sufficient parking availability for tenants.
Oftelie told Beamish that the parking spaces are adequate  and that tenants are aware of parking availability before they commit to a home.
Shaw was concerned that the homes adjacent to the police department would experience an overwhelming amount of noise from police and fire truck sirens.
Oftelie assured Shaw that noise levels were taken into consideration when designing the infrastructure and that sound levels shouldn’t increase.  Plus, the addition of a new wall structure around the police department will help reduce possible sound and add privacy.
If approved, renovations are expected to take a maximum 12 months to complete.

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Heights approves transfer of city elections to county

Heights approves transfer of city elections to county

Posted on 26 May 2015 by La Habra Journal

By Daniel Hernandez
La Habra Journal

La Habra Heights officials requested approval to consolidate its city council elections with Los Angeles County, handing control of the polling places to county officials, City Manager Shauna Clark confirmed.
After a costly and contentious March election in the small town up in the hills, which saw big turnouts of 49.5 percent of registered voters and a vote re-count, officials at the May 14 city council meeting surmised the possibility of saving money and staff time by handing over the duties of its elections to Los Angeles County.
“It’s possible the city can save as much as $24,000,” Clark said, basing the estimate on what the county water district pays for its elections.
But Clark admitted to not knowing how much the city can actually save until city officials research it further.
Clark hopes to have an answer from the county before the June 11 council meeting.
If the proposal to the county looks acceptable, Clark said, council will be able to discuss and possibly vote on a preliminary proposal next meeting.

After an election with a re-count initiated by a Heights resident looking to boost the vote total for city council candidate Alex Villanueva and also a contentious Healthy City Initiative, which aimed to stop Matrix Oil from drilling up to 30 wells in a parcel of land in La Habra Heights, council members directed Clark to seek the consolidation with the county.
The March 2015 election cost the city about $184,000, according to the Whittier Daily News, with most of the cost being attributed to the Healthy City Initiative, or Measure A, and including it on the ballot.
“There may be some financial benefit, but there may also be some benefit to the staff and integrity of the city if an occasion comes where there’s a dispute about the outcome of an election,” Mayor Michael Higgins said about ceding control of the elections. “It would then fall into the jurisdiction of the county.”
If a dispute were to occur, as happened in the this past election, Los Angeles county takes on the responsibility of organizing any possible actions, including a re-count, while La Habra Heights will not be liable, Higgins explained.
The city manager stated that La Habra Heights has never consolidated its city council elections with the county.
But if the council chooses to merge, the first consolidated election will be November of 2017, changing the date of the election by eight months, possibly increasing Mayor Higgins and council member’s Brian Bergman and Kyle Miller’s term.
“Once we get all of the information at the next meeting, we’ll make a determination,” Higgins said.
Although La Habra Heights residents had a large voter turnout this past March, combining the county with the city elections could effect turnout.
“I believe the thought right now is that we’ll increase voter turnout because it will combine with other elections at the same time,” Higgins said. “ But we enjoy such a good voter turnout anyway that I’m not putting a lot of weight on that because our people come out and vote.”
Los Angeles County as a whole has been mired with low voter turnout, and the last election was the lowest ever for a non-primary election with only 25.2 percent of more than four million registered voters taking time to cast a ballot in the November 2014 cycle.

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Two statewide honors for Sonora High School

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Two statewide honors for Sonora High School

Posted on 26 May 2015 by La Habra Journal

By Paul Krazer
For the La Habra Journal

The California Department of Education recently awarded Sonora High School two top awards.
The school has been recognized as a Gold Ribbon School and as a Title I Achieving School.

Jay Seidel/La Habra Journal Gold Ribbon: Sonora High School was recently named a Gold Ribbon School and a Title 1 Achieving School by the California Department of Education. The recognition is due in part to the school’s individual Pathways for Academic Thinkers program, which helps student success.

Jay Seidel/La Habra Journal
Gold Ribbon: Sonora High School was recently named a Gold Ribbon School and a Title 1 Achieving School by the California Department of Education. The recognition is due in part to the school’s individual Pathways for Academic Thinkers program, which helps student success.

“We are also so proud to be named a Title I Achieving School,” said Adam Bailey, principal of Sonora. “This award acknowledges the heart and soul of Sonora’s staff who constantly go above and beyond for all students. We could not be more proud of our school.”
To be recognized as a Gold Ribbon School, a school must send an application to the CDE.  The school must describe its program and explain why it feels it deserves Gold Ribbon designation.  The CDE then sends a team of evaluators to the school to verify the school’s claims.
Sonora’s application centered on its iPaTh program. iPaTh stands for Individual Pathways for Academic Thinkers program.
The program was started in the summer of 2012 as a way of helping at-risk students to be successful in high school. It started as a summer bridge program for incoming freshmen who were deemed as being in danger of not succeeding in high school.
The four-week summer program served about 100 children and focused on elevating their reading, math and study skills.
As the first iPaTh students progressed through their freshman year, it was found that they needed further support.  The program was expanded to include an elective course they could take as freshmen as well as after-school tutoring.
But has the intervention been successful?
A great deal of data has been collected on the students’ performance. Perhaps the most useful data are those which compare the iPaTh students to those who were invited to participate, but did not do so.
So far, the data validate the program. iPaTh students outperform other at-risk students who are not in the program.
In the summer of 2013 the bridge program was repeated for incoming freshman. Meanwhile, the first iPaTh group entered their sophomore year and it was found many of them needed continuing support.  An iPaTh elective was offered for them.  Another freshman bridge program was offered in the summer of 2014 and an elective for juniors was added for those who still need support.  It is hoped that iPaTh will have a positive impact on the  graduation rate and college attendance rate of the school’s at-risk students.
In late 2014, Sonora submitted its application for Gold Ribbon School designation.  The application highlighted the success of the fledgling iPaTh program.  A CDE team visited the school in April 2015 and validated Sonora’s claims,  agreeing that the school is worthy of the Gold Ribbon School honor.
In addition to the Gold Ribbon honor, Sonora is also a Title I Achieving School.
This award is based on a school’s demographics and its students’ performance. About half of Sonora’s students get a free or reduced-price lunch.  Often, such students show lower attendance rates, lower graduation rates and lower scores on standardized tests.
Over 95 percent of Sonora’s students graduate and over 90 percent pass the California High School Exit Exam on their first try. For this reason, Sonora earned the honor of Title I Achieving School.
“We are so proud of our Sonora staff, students and parents in earning the Gold Ribbon School Award for our Individual Pathways for Academic Thinkers program,” Bailey said. “This program is a testimony to how hard a group of teachers, support staff and parents can work to improve the lives of students at Sonora each day.”

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Imperial shows off its coasters

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Imperial shows off its coasters

Posted on 26 May 2015 by La Habra Journal

By Breanna Flores
La Habra Journal

Roller coasters and other engineering marvels filled the Multipurpose Room at Imperial Middle School Friday morning as the eighth grade physical science class displayed their original creations at the second Roller Coaster Showcase.

Creative coasters: Nancy Nava, Joseline Gonzalez, Jesus Flores, Violet Gonzalez and Emily Villegas show off their candy-themed coaster at Imperial Middle School’s Gym on Friday.

Creative coasters: Nancy Nava, Joseline Gonzalez, Jesus Flores, Violet Gonzalez and Emily Villegas show off their candy-themed coaster at Imperial Middle School’s Gym on Friday.

Professional engineers were invited to evaluate the more than 44 unique architectural designs. Evaluations were based on a two-minute informative presentation and on the actual roller coaster. The presentation, or “sales pitch,” needed to include key concepts such as kinetic energy, negative acceleration and Newton’s first law of motion.
Roller coasters were graded on appearance, the number of loops, creativity and whether or not the group stayed within the $25 assigned budget.
Students were given creative freedom to use a variety of materials to build their roller coaster. Electrical tape and electronic or motorized parts were the only items that were prohibited.
Jennifer Herrera, Kimberly Benitez, Vanessa Ortiz and Bryana Suarez designed “Fear Factor,” a roller coaster inspired by phobias. Toilet paper rolls and wooden dowels were secured with glue to create their frightful amusement park ride.
“I think [this project] taught us teamwork because throughout this whole thing we got mad at each other a lot,” Herrera said.
Disagreements over themes, designs and materials were common among most groups.

Creative coasters: Imperial Middle School students (from left) Maria Carlos, Emily Rivas, Hannah Callirgos and Emily Escobar demonstrate how their engineered coaster works.

Creative coasters: Imperial Middle School students (from left) Maria Carlos, Emily Rivas, Hannah Callirgos and Emily Escobar demonstrate how their engineered coaster works.

“[Project-Based Learning] is a more hands-on approach. It’s a problem/solution type of approach, and more importantly, it involves all of the Four Cs. Not only are they just showing their roller coasters, but they have to actually describe all of the physics concepts that are involved in that,” Csilla Koppany, 8th grade physical science teacher, said.
Koppany also said that most of the items used to build the roller coasters were items that could be found in a trash can, like toilet paper rolls and toothpicks.
Alexis Arrieta, the designated spokesperson for “Reality’s Worst Nightmare,” said that her group opted for a scary theme that would trigger a variety of fears.
David Rico and Chris Chang of “Atlas” said that their group had difficulty communicating and constantly changed their ideas about how the roller coaster should be structured.
“We created a hanging one, 3-feet tall, and we actually tried to make it out of trading cards. It didn’t work well. We knew we were running out of time, so then we made one out of wire. That didn’t work, so we ended up with this,” Rico said.
Multiple redesigns and last minute changes were not uncommon for groups.

Imperial Middle School Roller coaster competition 2015

Imperial Middle School Roller coaster competition 2015

“A lot of the time what they have in their head, might be very, very different once they start to build. That’s where the engineering process comes into play. You see a tremendous amount of frustration, but what’s great about it, is they don’t give up. They go back and redesign.” Koppany said.
Assistant Principal Michele Robinson attended the showcase this year for the first time. She said that students were learning science through this creative project and were challenged to use their critical thinking skills.
Professional engineers and parents were given the opportunity to visit the showcase first. Students who did not participate in the showcase were invited to visit the Multipurpose Room later in the day.
With the second event such a success, Koppany said that the Roller Coaster Showcase will be an annual event for Imperial Middle School students for years to come.

Imperial Middle School Roller coaster competition 2015

Imperial Middle School Roller coaster competition 2015

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Drought causing new LH water regulations

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Drought causing new LH water regulations

Posted on 26 May 2015 by La Habra Journal

By Nur Sattar
For the La Habra Journal

La Habra began its water conservation efforts in August of 2014 following Governor Gerry Brown’s executive order that the state needed to cut down by 20 percent.Presentation page 4
The city called for cut backs of 25 percent through the “Stage 2 Declaration” water shortage supply program that was implemented August 2014.
The declaration prohibits watering your lawn more than two days a week, washing of driveways, sidewalks and asphalts, and washing of vehicles with a hose. The declaration also warns against the runoff of water onto public median turfs and public right of way.
“When you’re watering…you can’t have your water in the gutter or in the street waste water,” said Elias Saykali, director of public works.
Newly added regulations include drip lines for irrigation in new homes that are constructed and residents may have to pay $10,000 a day for violating the terms of the Declaration.
So far, La Habra hasn’t had any violations. If anyone is caught going against the measures the city is proposing, officials try to work it out by giving a warning and leaving door tags.
“We try to educate people and for the most part that works, we haven’t had to issue any citations,” said Brian Jones, water and sewer manager.
At the Town Hall Meeting held on April 30th detailing drought conservation methods Saykali mentioned that the city had invested around $12 million dollars to build the Portola and La Bonita Wells.
The first groundwater well was established in La Habra in 1980 and now there are three, which amounts to 44% of the city’s water supply. These wells allow the city to cut back in the amount of water it pulls from the Municipal Water District of Orange County.
“The cost of local well water drawn from the La Habra basin is much lower than from our other sources of supply,” Jones said.
“The reason we don’t do more [extract] is because of the safe yield,” Saykali said.
The safe yield is the level determined by engineers that determines how much water can be extracted without inflicting any harm on the land.
At the La Habra Town Hall Meeting on drought conservation held on April 30th Saykali presented slides outlining that 7% of La Habra’s water supply in 2015 came from MWDOC.
“We didn’t or buy any water from MWDOC last year or the year before,” Saykali said.
La Habra is also pushing for a “brown is the new green movement” which encourages replacement of turf with drought tolerant options.
The city has drought tolerant landscape medians on Lambert Road.
Dr. Sean Chamberlin an oceanography professor at Fullerton College organized a project with funding provided by the Metropolitan Water District of California. The project entailed training a group of students with the basic ideas needed to introduce drought tolerant plants into lawns. The students then took that training back to their communities to introduce to their parents and neighbors.
Chamberlin explained that the best way to get started is to focus on a small area or corner.
“Start somewhere, learn how to do it and become familiar with the plants. It’s not that they’re just cactus, there’s lots of really beautiful lush plants that don’t require much water,” Chamberlin said.
Despite the variety in drought tolerant options, Chamberlin pointed out that the process of completely replacing one’s lawn with these options can be research heavy.
“You have to really educate yourself to know what to plant and do the planning,” Chamberlin said.
Some of the difficulties in replacing your lawns can include dealing with Latin names of plants and only seasonal options of these plants available in Lowe’s and Home Depot.
“For the average homeowner the key is to just start with something,” Chamberlin said. “Start with one plant, buy it and put it in and see what it does, you want to reduce the amount of lawn.”
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Country star shares thanks from troops

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Country star shares thanks from troops

Posted on 08 May 2015 by La Habra Journal

Nashville star: Country singer Trace Adkins stopped by the La Habra Library Tuesday to say thanks from the troops serving in Afghanistan to La Habra Girl Scouts for sending more than 1,000 cookies overseas. Adkins also gave special recognition to Arbolita second grader Jessica Alatorre, whose letter he saw brightened soldiers’ day while he was in Afghanistan visiting the troops as part of the USO. Adkins shared his story and some gifts with the girls.

Nashville star: Country singer Trace Adkins stopped by the La Habra Library Tuesday to say thanks from the troops serving in Afghanistan to La Habra Girl Scouts for sending more than 1,000 cookies overseas. Adkins also gave special recognition to Arbolita second grader Jessica Alatorre, whose letter he saw brightened soldiers’ day while he was in Afghanistan visiting the troops as part of the USO. Adkins shared his story and some gifts with the girls.

Before Tuesday, May 5, Jessica Alatorre was your typical second grade student at Arbolita Elementary, working on homework and planning for a summer filled with trips to visit family and spend time at the beach. After Tuesday, Jessica, as well as the La Habra community, became the face of hope and encouragement to soldiers deployed in Kandahar, Afghanistan after recognition from country music star Trace Adkins during a special visit to La Habra.

It began with two projects — Hearts for Heroes and Treat the Troops. On February 12, the La Habra Library hosted Hearts for Heroes, giving the community the opportunity to write encouraging notes to American soldiers deployed overseas.
Alatorre, one of the students that receives help with her homework from a high school student through the award-winning Homework Help group, contributed an intricately-decorated card for the cause during her homework session that day.
That card, along with several others, got put in a box with over 1,000 Girl Scout cookies donated by community members through Treat the Troops to be sent overseas. When purchasing Girl Scout cookies, local buyers could also donate five dollars to send a box to the troops through the Treat the Troops program.
The many boxes of Girl Scout cookies, letters from local Girl Scouts and through the Hearts for Heroes, were all sent in a large shipment paid for by the City of La Habra’s Operation Stay Connected program.
Enter Trace Adkins. His involvement with the United Service Organization brought him on a tour bringing entertainment to soldiers overseas, specifically Kandahar, Afghanistan.

A caring soul: Country singing star Trace Adkins holds up a card that second grade student Jessica Alatorre (right) made and sent to the troops in Afghanistan. Adkins stopped by the La Habra Library Tuesday to thank Alatorre and the LH Girl Scouts for their kindness.

A caring soul: Country singing star Trace Adkins holds up a card that second grade student Jessica Alatorre (right) made and sent to the troops in Afghanistan. Adkins stopped by the La Habra Library Tuesday to thank Alatorre and the LH Girl Scouts for their kindness.

While enjoying a cup of coffee with Lieutenant-Colonel Bill Wiles of C Co, 426th Brigade Support Battalion, 101st Airborne Division, he noticed the wall piled high with boxes of Girl Scout cookies and a special box filled with handmade cards.
“I just started looking through them and thought, ‘this is so cool that kids take the time to sit down and make these cards by hand and send them to the soldiers’,” Trace Adkins said during his visit to La Habra.
Adkins was so inspired by the creativity and hard work put into Alatorre’s card and the large giving from the Girl Scouts that he wanted to stop by and give encouragement in return with his presence.
“I wanted to come here and tell you today that your cookies made it to Kandahar Afghanistan,” Adkins said. “I ate some of ‘em, so I know they got there.”

Also sending his thanks was Lt. Col. Wiles.
“Thank you for your cookies, they mean a lot to all of us in Kandahar, Afghanistan,” Wiles wrote in a letter read by Adkins during his visit. “We all really appreciate your thoughts and gifts. Thank you again, Lt. Col. Bill Wiles.”
Adkins finished his time by presenting the letter from Lt. Col. Wiles, a photo of Adkins and Wiles in Afghanistan with the two letters and his black cowboy hat to Alatorre.

On my honor..: Jessica Alatorre holds up her fingers and recites the Girl Scout Promise as she becomes a new scout Tuesday.

On my honor..: Jessica Alatorre holds up her fingers and recites the Girl Scout Promise as she becomes a new scout Tuesday.

“I just wanted to come and see this young lady and tell her how much they appreciate this,” Adkins added.
Even at a young age, Jessica realized the impact her small gesture made for the troops overseas.
“It’s really not fair cause people from their families are missing them and they are far, far away,” Alatorre said.
Members of the community saw this kind gesture by Adkins as a point of pride for La Habra and the collaborative effort to support and encourage the troops.
“This isn’t just about Girl Scouts,” said Sandra San Miguel, the Girl Scouts service unit manager for La Habra, “This is about the city and about the people, everybody coming together.”
San Miguel was an integral part in getting Adkins connected with Alatorre, as well as Jill Patterson, the branch manager of the La Habra Library.
After Adkins’ appearance, Alatorre was also made an official Girl Scout by the La Habra troop. With her huge smile, she held her fingers up as the Girl Scout sign and recited the pledge.
“It was really heartwarming,” Patterson said of the day’s events. “Councilwoman Rose Espinoza always said, ‘La Habra, a caring community’, and I feel that La Habra really is a family-friendly community.”

By Ashleigh Fox / La Habra Journal

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